Is chocolate bad for dogs?

Chocolate is poisonous to dogs mostly because of its theobromine content, which dogs are unable to metabolize effectively. If your dog eats chocolate, you should monitor them closely and seek veterinary attention if they show any symptoms, or if they are very young, pregnant or have other health concerns.

How much chocolate is safe for a dog?

For milk chocolate, any ingestion of more than 0.5 ounces per pound of body weight may put dogs at risk for chocolate poisoning. Ingestions of more than 0.13 ounces per pound of dark or semi-sweet chocolate may cause poisoning.

Are all types of chocolate bad for dogs?

All types of chocolate can be toxic to dogs, but the amount of chocolate and type ingested are important factors to consider, because the concentration of caffeine and theobromine can vary. In general, darker, more bitter chocolate is considered to be the most dangerous.

What foods are toxic to dogs?

The following foods may be dangerous to your pet:

  • Alcoholic beverages.
  • Apple seeds.
  • Apricot pits.
  • Avocados.
  • Cherry pits.
  • Candy (particularly chocolate—which is toxic to dogs, cats, and ferrets—and any candy containing the toxic sweetener Xylitol)
  • Coffee (grounds, beans, and chocolate-covered espresso beans)
  • Garlic.

Is cheese bad for dogs?

While cheese can be safe to feed to your dog, there are some things to remember. Cheese is high in fat, and feeding too much to your dog regularly can cause weight gain and lead to obesity. Even more problematic, it could lead to pancreatitis, a serious and potentially fatal illness in dogs.

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What do I do if my dog ate chocolate?

Call an Emergency Vet if Your Dog Has Chocolate Toxicity

If you know or think your dog has consumed chocolate, call an emergency vet right away.

How do you treat chocolate poisoning in dogs at home?

After your dog eats chocolate: steps to take at home

Vetted Pet Care suggests taking only three percent solution of Hydrogen Peroxide (not the concentrated six percent solution) and putting 1ml for every pound of body weight (so 16 ml for 16 pounds), into food or in a dropper to feed her to induce vomiting.